News | Yukon River Quest Introduces Experimental SUP Class

Lina Augaitis performs the first documented SUP expedition of the Yukon River. Will she repeat her journey for the 2016 YRQ? Photo: Andrew Dye

Lina Augaitis performs the first documented SUP expedition of the Yukon River. Will she repeat her journey for the 2016 YRQ? Photo: Andrew Dye

News | Yukon River Quest Introduces Experimental SUP Class for 2016

For nearly two decades, the Yukon River Quest has upheld its legacy as one of the most revered adventure and endurance races in paddlesports. Held June 29 through July 3 every year, the YRQ is the longest annual paddle race in the world. Its course begins at the source of the Yukon River in Whitehorse, Canada, and runs downriver through 444 miles of Yukon Territory to Dawson City. Its completion is recognized by canoeists and kayakers as one of the community’s most honorable accomplishments.

With SUP’s  relatively recent spike in popularity as a vessel for river and distance expeditions, registration for the Yukon River Quest is now open to standup paddleboarders for the first time in the event’s history.

“(The SUP) class is experimental so we can see if enough of these craft can meet our cutoff times and finish the race without taxing our safety team and volunteers,” said YRQ media director, Jeff Brady. “There will be no prize money in this class this year, but finishers will receive finisher pins and be listed in our results.”

The SUP division of the 2016 Yukon River Quest is limited to ten entrants, so if you’re hoping to get involved, register now! Applicants will be considered on a case-by-case basis, and must submit a race resume for evaluation. Only standup paddlers with extensive experience in racing and adventure paddling will be allowed to participate. Registration is now open for the June 29th through July 3rd race, so don’t wait!

For more info and to register, visit the Yukon River Quest website.

To read about the first documented SUP expedition on the Yukon River, check out Lina Augaitis’ blog post from her journey.

More on the Yukon River.